Markets we are attending before Christmas

With only a few weeks left until the summer holidays when we get busy with picking, drying and making herbal infusions, we are now making the final arrangements for the last weekends of this glorious year.

We have been asked which markets you can find us at in the next weeks leading to Christmas. So here they are:

25 November (Saturday) – Lancefield farmers market (9am – 1pm)
26 November (Sunday) – Patchwork to Pickles fair @Buda House, Castlemaine (10am – 4pm)
2 December (Saturday) – Woodend farmers market (9am – 1pm)
3 December (Sunday) – Eltham craft & produce market (8.30am – 1.30pm)
9 December (Saturday) – Kyneton farmers market (9am – 1pm)
15 December (Friday) – Castlemaine artists twilight market (4pm – 8.30pm)
16 December (Saturday) – Asburton / Boroondara artisan market (Ashburton Library, 10am – 2pm)
17 December (Sunday) – Eltham craft & produce market (8.30am – 1.30pm)

Markets are fun, but if you can’t make it to the market, don’t stress, our online store remains open throughout this period and thereafter! 😊

Love for Lavender


We are well into spring now and lavender is one of our garden’s beauties to unfold its splendour. The colour, the scent, the bees busily buzzing around, it is hard not to love lavender. There aren’t many herbs around which can claim being as well known and widely used throughout centuries and cultures. With its both relaxing and stimulating energy, lavender seduces one at the first sight, enchanting both the body and the spirit.

Used in and on the body, in cooking and around the house (ah, those aromatic linens!) or just for the pure pleasure of the eyes, lavender has countless benefits and qualities. It is soothing, calming, antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, anti-microbial, healing and rejuvenating. More on its properties here.

Lavender is my go-to for wound nursing, headaches, respiratory issues as well as a sleeping aid, to perfume my daughter’s bathwater, for a lovely evening tea or when I feel under pressure or a bit down. And if you haven’t tried a fresh lavender champagne, it should be on your must-do list this summer. 😉

 

Lavender is amazing in itself, but it also blends beautifully with bergamot, sage, peppermint, chamomile, geranium, rosemary, eucalyptus, palmarosa, juniper. No wonder it’s so widely used in mists and nourishing balms for skin. And, of course, you can find most of these combinations in our facial oils.

Stay fresh and enjoy your spring! 🐝 😇

PS. Pictured above it’s a flamboyant Victorian bred lavender called The Princess, which is the first lavender (or shall I say pink?) bush to bloom on our property. 😍

 

To market, to market 😊 – updated

To market, to market!Spring is nearly here and we are making it to markets again this season. We really have been missing our lovely customers and market goers. We are going to be at  Lancefield & District Farmers’ Market this Saturday. Weather is going to be beautiful with a top of 20oC and maybe a few showers, but who cares? It’s Spring!
Looking forward to seeing you there! 💝

Love,

Stefania & co

No claims or promises

I will never promise my products will make you beautiful – you already are!! Nor my products won’t make you bright – we wouldn’t have met unless you had already been so bright. My products won’t make you look younger either. There is absolutely nothing wrong with wrinkles, they make you look authentic and tell all the feelings and experiences you have been through. They are there to remind of beautiful moments, fears, delights, stress and exhaustion. Because you fully give yourself to every emotion, with no reserve.

I am not making any promises here. It is not my business to afford ground for expectations.  I am only claiming one thing, that we all deserve to enjoy the nature’s goodness to care for our bodies and souls. Just saying… 😇

With love and joy,

Stefania

The beauty of simplifying

The question I get most when I get to meet with people at the markets is about my skin-care routine. I am an uncomplicated person and my skin-care routine is even more so. And I am not at all missing the days when I used to cleanse, scrub, tone and moisturise my skin with patience every night only to find it patchy and pore-clogged the next day.

One thing I’ve changed is the time when I put something on my face, always in the morning as the best moisturiser we have already built-in (aka the sebum) is produced at night. This way, in the morning I only top-up the natural reserves. Just because nothing beats nature. (I’ll talk about the illogic of rich night creams soon, promise!)

The other thing I’ve changed is the number of things I put on my skin. From many to just a couple. The first I ditched were the cleansers and scrubs. I used honey instead. Until I didn’t feel the need for it either. I just have a few splashes of water at night and in the morning. Then a spritz of sandalwood hydrosol which is totally optional, but I love the scent and it actually helps the oils to absorb deeper into the skin. And, at last, a few drops of facial oil massaged nicely for a couple of minutes onto my face and neck. Eyes included, of course. I don’t need to have a separate eye cream or serum, my facial oil is more than gentle to take care of the delicate skin around my eyes too.

Another important shift is the frequency of “pampering” the skin. While I moisturise my face and neck every morning and my whole body once or twice a week (we live in a dry area, so my skin gets thirsty, particularly in summer), it’s only once a month or even less often that I use a treatment that does all the nourishing, exfoliating and deep cleansing at once. However this is rather a treat than a real need for happy and healthy skin.

I know I’ve said it before, but I really believe “less is more”.

Much love,

Stefania

Summer throughout

It is the midst of the summer here in country Victoria and it may seem like we have more of an idle time since we don’t do any markets. It is however the busiest time of the year on the backend of Thornhill Lane. We pick. We dry. We bottle up. Then we strain and start again.

Summer is when timing is really essential as we have to pick the herbs at their maximum potency, generally leaves right before the plant gets into blossom, while flowers are to be picked when they are fully open. Usually late morning, after the dew dries up. Then straight on the drying racks on single layers, in the dark. For a few days or until the plant material is crisp-dry. Followed by 6-8 weeks of sun-infusing. Or sun-blessing.

This is a time when we are delighted with the most amazing scents and colours. Which are later imparted graciously to our herbal oils.

If our products are so loved and revered, the secret is no doubt intrinsically hidden in these luscious herbal oils. They are the true heart of our handcrafting.

Ps. Above pictured is St. John’s wort freshly wildcrafted from a clean local source. The herbal oil obtained from these gorgeous flowers is insanely dark red with a sweet berry aroma. More like a syrup than an infused oil. Cheers! ????

Happy Australia day and 10% off

We are so part of the Australian landscape – we live in the country on a typical small farming setup, enjoying hot summer days, clear skies and desert-like winds, and our life on this blessed continent has grafted so well on our roots – that we would like to celebrate this Australia Day by offering our wonderful customers a 10% discount. Until 31st January.

No need to add any code – George has already applied his magic on that – just do your shopping and you’ll get the 10% off at the end. Yes, we like it simple ????

Happy Australia day!! We are grateful to be part of this totally awesome nation.

Love,

Stefania & co ❤❤❤

Healing Powerhouse – Comfrey

Comfrey is a plant we widely use in our garden and household, from nourishing fertiliser for plants to dressing bandages for wounds and inflammation. It really works wonders!

We started with a few root cuttings a few years ago and we now have plants all around our garden fence in an effort to keep the gum roots away (still to be proven). Both the root and the leaves are useful, we collect the leaves in summer and roots late in autumn. Leaves are best harvested right when the plant gets to the flowering stage.

As for its skin-loving properties, comfrey is vulnerary, which means it helps with closing and healing the wounds. It is also called ‘knitbone’ due to its ability to stitch the bone tissue, so it’s also helpful in fractures and sprains.

Comfrey is also great for inflammation – applied as an ointment or fresh leaves poultice, it reduces the swelling and stiffness as well as the appearance of bruises.

Plenty of reasons for me to dry comfrey and make it into a herbal infused oil which I use in our wonderfully scented healing balm.

I totally love comfrey! I believe it is one of the best healing plants around and it shouldn’t miss from anyone’s garden. At least for its beautiful bluebells-like flowers. Have a closer look at their exquisite growing pattern.

Comfrey is easy to grow, I should however add that it is very hard to get rid of. When established, even the tiniest bit of root will shoot back. But once you find out about all its wonderful uses, this is not a drawback any more.

Comfrey flower

Patricia says

I love getting feedback from customers ????

Here is what I got today:

Hi Stefania
I bought your products form Barkly Square in Brunswick. I love them (Face oil, sandalwood spray and BBB cream which I use it for a hand/ body cream). All the dryness on my skin is now gone and have had no pimples even with the change of face products. My 6yo daughter uses the lip cream which she loves.
I am going to buy more for my sister, who only uses natural products.
Thank you for making such beautiful products.
Kind Regards
Patricia

Thank you so much, Patricia! You really made my day xxx